Reading Without Walls

Before we launch into today’s post, I’m sure you noticed I changed the name of the blog. Why did I do that?

Two reasons:

  1. I’m not bored anymore. I have a new job with lots of new exciting opportunities that have me revved up.
  2. I first got the name Teaching Academia in trying to narrow down what my YouTube channel should do. That channel has been all over the map, but I finally got a grip. I’ll be focusing on specific teaching tips you can use in academia. Think of the blog as extended discussions on teaching and learning which will include greater elaborations on how to teach than the videos.

The nice thing now is that the blog and the YouTube channel are in sync with each other. Each month I’ll be back to posting a review of new material from the channel (last Thursday of each month starting in May)

And now…on with the post!

Reading Without Walls

The other day I heard about this fabulous initiative from Gene Yang called Reading Without Walls. The idea is to get people reading more diverse books, and you can see the guidelines here. Although this is officially happening in the month of April, I thought I would take the idea and infuse it into my online classes for both fall and spring of the next academic year.

What’s really great about the rules of the challenge is that they could be implemented into any class. You could use them as is or tweak them as needed. For example, the rule, “Read a book about a topic you don’t know much about,” could be modified so that students are reading a book in an area they have minimal knowledge about but that fits into whatever subject area your class is on.

I’m teaching a class on adolescent literacy, so I’m asking the students to select young adult literature (any genre and any format) that adhere to Yang’s guidelines. I’m still working on the directions. However, there will be lots of options embedded within it so that students can dive into it deeply or just dip their toe in the water. My goal with this assignment is to use it:

  • use it as an opportunity to work in young adult literature; i previously did not have this as part of the course. i wanted to, but one course can only do so much; i like that i can connect the reading of young adult literature to a wider purpose
  • help expand students’ understandings of and experiences with YA literature. think of the opportunities that exist here in terms of students getting to select their own books and deepen their knowledge of your subject area; that’s too amazing to pass up!

Of course you might be wondering how I will know if people read the books. I simply said that students have to provide evidence that they read them, and they can do that however they wish.

Going Even Further with Booksnaps!

Earlier in the week I had started thinking about incorporating booksnaps into my class. I’m relatively new to the whole #booksnap thing, but as I understand it the basic idea is that you identify meaningful quotes from your text. You take a picture of these and put them into snapchat. That’s the gist of it.  The following video will show you a bit more:

What I chose to do was make this essentially a bonus aspect of the Reading Without Walls assignment. Although, technically, I could expand it out and allow students to do booksnaps with anything. For now, students create the booksnap in snapchat, share it on twitter (#booksnaps) and the compile a list of their booksnaps into Storify which they give to me at the end of the semester. I’m not requiring booksnaps because I know not everyone wants to use snapchat and twitter. It is an interesting way though to pick up extra points as a student.

And that’s it!

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