Overwhelmed Online

I have been very excited that I will finally be teaching fully online! I ordered some desk copies of a few books, and they were spot on with what I needed. I felt like I was really getting ahead of the curve. I’m about six-seven months out from the first course starting, and I already have great books I can use! Now all I have to do is think about what we’re going to be learning and how that is going to play out in an online environment.

doomCue the feeling of being incredibly overwhelmed.

What Happened?

I panicked and froze up when I sat down and started to work things out. I mean, I know how to write a syllabus. I’ve done it so many times. I’ve developed plenty of new courses. I’ve got the skill set, right?

What happened is that everything looked so exciting and fun that everything looked exciting and fun. I couldn’t make a decision about what direction to move in because I could visualize so many possibilities that I struggled to make a decision.

While part of my brain was focusing on content, the other part of my brain was trying to figure out how to construct a class that was innovative and creative and edgy. And honestly, that is the LAST thing I need to thinking about right now.

Part of the problem was also that I’m used to planning hybrid classes. I’m used to having face-to-face sessions where we can touch base in person about things as a group. For some reason, suddenly not having this cause my brain to fail. I don’t know why.

Creating Structure

I learned something from this, and that is the importance of structure. While I was trying to think about what to teach and how to teach it, I had neglected to consider the time frame. And while this is two courses that the same students take over a year, I needed to break it down into more manageable chunks. Thinking about how to teacher over a year, for something I have never taught before in a context I have never taught in, is too much. So I went back to something familiar.

I pulled up the academic calendar for next year, and I started creating weeks. Because my course never meets in person, it never has an official day assigned to it that I can touch base with. No big deal. I assigned it one. I picked Monday. Every time Monday hit, we started a new week. And I went through the calendar and mapped out all the weeks for the fall and the spring.

This is soooo not very exciting, right? And yet, very necessary. We have to embed structure in an online course or else students will float around in it and probably not do as well as they could. While I would like to have some free choice embedded within the course, I think I have to create a continuum of events that range from more to less freedom in terms of when they get accomplished.

And Now Back to the Content

So this is where I have gotten since we last spoke. I became overwhelmed, shut down, and then made a calendar. Now I’m back to focusing on what I want students to learn and if/how I want to use these texts I received. I’m trying not to consider things like assignments or if/how I want to apply gamification to the course. I probably do, but if I let the idea start rolling around in my mind I’ll get panicked again.

I think, for me, the message here is that there is always some value in going old school style in planning a class and writing a syllabus. It’s what I know well, and it helps me get the content down. Once I have that content then I can figure out what to do with it in ways that take advantage of it being an online class. Until I know what I am teaching, I can’t be overly concerned about the online space.

One Year Ago

Two Years Ago

Comments 12

  • […] I noted that I had identified some great books I could use for the courses. This was still the case, but I […]

  • […] I noted that I had identified some great books I could use for the courses. This was still the case, but I […]

  • Very true. I’ve recently gone from teaching 100% online to teaching at a school where most days I don’t have access to student technology. I can confidently say that content is king. My online courses evolved from only covering the content in short videos/tasks to engaging and fun gamified adventures.
    Even teaching in-class with little technology I have to start with some way just to get the content done before the ideas and improvements start to flow. Once an effective way to cover the content has been built, my brain is free to inovate and get creative with new experiments. I look back at my first GAFE courses and my old YouTube videos and laugh, but the truth is I needed to “get the course built” before I could truly design something unique.

    • I like what you said here, “Once an effective way to cover the content has been built, my brain is free to innovate and get creative with new experiments.” That is exactly how I feel right now! I have to get my head around the content before I can innovate, but I am looking forward to the innovate part!

  • Very true. I’ve recently gone from teaching 100% online to teaching at a school where most days I don’t have access to student technology. I can confidently say that content is king. My online courses evolved from only covering the content in short videos/tasks to engaging and fun gamified adventures.
    Even teaching in-class with little technology I have to start with some way just to get the content done before the ideas and improvements start to flow. Once an effective way to cover the content has been built, my brain is free to inovate and get creative with new experiments. I look back at my first GAFE courses and my old YouTube videos and laugh, but the truth is I needed to “get the course built” before I could truly design something unique.

    • I like what you said here, “Once an effective way to cover the content has been built, my brain is free to innovate and get creative with new experiments.” That is exactly how I feel right now! I have to get my head around the content before I can innovate, but I am looking forward to the innovate part!

  • […] interesting because so far I haven’t done anything that is specifically about teaching online. What I have done so far could be done in any context, and that’s an important point. […]

  • […] interesting because so far I haven’t done anything that is specifically about teaching online. What I have done so far could be done in any context, and that’s an important point. […]

  • I’m feeling that same way right now as I am designing a new 8 week Foundations in Literacy course! You are right that structure and content are key, but like you I can lose focus when trying to make it interesting and innovative.
    I am currently struggling to find the good books part of the course because there are so many out there. Any suggestions?

    • I tend to not use books for my courses. I usually use articles. I tend to go through the most relevant journals and pull things. I’ll message you on twitter and send you a link to my syllabus from last fall that might be helpful.

  • I’m feeling that same way right now as I am designing a new 8 week Foundations in Literacy course! You are right that structure and content are key, but like you I can lose focus when trying to make it interesting and innovative.
    I am currently struggling to find the good books part of the course because there are so many out there. Any suggestions?

    • I tend to not use books for my courses. I usually use articles. I tend to go through the most relevant journals and pull things. I’ll message you on twitter and send you a link to my syllabus from last fall that might be helpful.