Search results for «twitter»

Popping with Twitter

As you know, I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about how to use twitter in my instruction. There’s been lots of trial and error (and revision!) of my approach over the last year. One of my concerns as I got into the current semester was being able to promote twitter use in ways that …

Scoring Twitter Chats

Last year, I had a goal to improve how I used twitter in my instruction (read about it here, here, and here). My biggest struggle with using twitter has always been how to score it. How many points do I assign someone? How do I know if someone participated enough in terms of quantity and …

Revising the Extended Twitter Chat

For the last year, I’ve been working on how to use twitter in my instruction. A couple of months ago, I tried doing an asynchronous twitter chat with one of my classes. It went ok – people participated (it wasn’t required), but I didn’t like I how I set it up. It ended up being …

Twitter Chat Follow-Up

Last week, I wrote about having an extended twitter chat with my students. This week, I wanted to follow up with what I learned from it. Keep in mind that the chat was not required, and I did not publicize it to my students beyond posting an announcement about it on twitter. There was a …

The Extended Twitter Chat

I’m trying something new this quick with one of my classes. We’re going to have an extended twitter chat. I’ve used twitter chats before in my Masters classes. However, in those cases we met for 30-45 minutes at an assigned time and had a discussion using a set of questions I developed in advanced. I …

Hidden Games Using Twitter

One of my goals this semester was to learn how to use twitter more effectively in my teaching. It’s a broad goal, and it allows for it to materialize in any number of ways. When the semester started, I felt like I hadn’t done anything to really further this goal. I had zero ideas. And …

Twitter, Storify, & My Class

My Politics of Reading course is winding down. Actually, the entire semester is almost over. We spent one of our last classes talking about assessment, testing, and the Common Core State Standards. We’ve actually been talking about these things throughout the semester. I wanted my students to get a larger sense of the issues related to testing …

What Do Students Think About Twitter Chats?

Today, I bring you a guest post from a student in my Masters class. Taylor was nice enough to share her thoughts on participating in twitter chats as a part of our course. I hope her insights help extend your thoughts on my previous posts about using twitter as an instructional tool and help you …

Having the Twitter Chat

I know, I know…this is quickly turning into Mondays with Twitter. I hope you are at least finding it interesting and useful. I think, with this post, I’ll have said all I need to say about Twitter chats for awhile.  Anyways, in case you are just joining, be sure to check out my previous posts …

Taking Twitter Live in Three Easy Steps

Last week, I wrote about getting started with twitter chats and doing a mock one in my class. In this post, I want to talk about what to expect when the chat goes live and what you might expect if you do one. First, Set Some Basic Rules Yes, you need to prepare your students …

Using Twitter in Class

I love, love, love experimenting with different social media tools as a part of my teaching. I love it for several reasons: (a) it lets me learn a new tool and/or how a tool can be applied to instruction (b) it teaches my students a new tool and/or gets them thinking about it in a …

Microlearning in F2F Classes

Recently, I read this post by Peggy Semingson. In it, she discusses the concept of microlearning in online education. She defines microlearning as: Microlearning consists of microcontent that is delivered via an electronic device, including but not limited to a mobile device, app, learning management system, computer, and/or laptop. The goal is to “chunk” learning …

The Syllabus as Verb

Recently, I wrote a post where I talked about how I structured my syllabus around the terms Read, Watch, Do, & Play.  I used these terms because I thought they better captured the spirit of the work I was asking students to do in my upcoming online course. I received some feedback on twitter: Now, I don’t have …

Issues of Time in Teaching Online: Part 1

One of the things I have struggled with in going fully online is thinking through issues related to time. Specifically I have had to think through: (a) how much time students should spend engaged in the course during a week and (b) how much time I will be spending. In this post, I want to …

The Importance of Failure

Recently, I came across this article which discusses the importance of normalizing failure as a part of the learning process. Failure, the author argues, is a part of the learning process. However, from the moment we first enter schools failure is treated as something to be avoided at all costs. It is something to be …

Examining The Points-Based Grading System

Recently, I came across this article on point-based grading systems. The ideas in the article were nothing new, and I’m sure you’ve heard most (if not all) before. This includes things like: students expect and are used to points points are not entirely objective points are an extrinsic form of motivation; the goal is to …

The Problems with Competencies

I’ve been reading College Disrupted: The Great Unbundling of Higher Education. Because I am in the middle of reading it, this post isn’t meant to be a review of the book (which I am thoroughly enjoying). The point of this post is to bring us back around to discussing issues with competency based education in higher education. …

A Student’s Reflections on Grading

Today I bring you a guest post from a recent student. In this post, the student reflects on what it’s like to be in a class that uses gamification and XP as a form of grading. I’m thrilled to be able to share this with you because it’s always helpful to get a perspective on …

Reading Without Walls

Before we launch into today’s post, I’m sure you noticed I changed the name of the blog. Why did I do that? Two reasons: I’m not bored anymore. I have a new job with lots of new exciting opportunities that have me revved up. I first got the name Teaching Academia in trying to narrow down what …

Online Courses: Lessons Learned (Part 2)

Last week, I wrote about how I have been taking two online courses and lessons I was learning as part of being a student in that context. Previously, I wrote about what I learned from taking the Twitter Masterminds course. Today, I want to share with you a lesson I have learned from being a …