Search results for «pathway»

Documenting Customizable Pathways

Last week, I wrote about the concept of customizable pathway design in online learning. I ended the post by asking three questions: How do we document this? How do I know that students did what they said they would do? How do I know what students are learning or need more help with? Basically, while …

Dual Pathways in Online Learning

I’m slowly plugging away at developing my online class for the fall. In previous posts, I have talked about developing a story for my syllabus to tell (see Part 1 and Part 2). And while I’m still working on identifying readings, I am also exploring ideas about how to structure my course. Enter this fabulous …

The End of Wikispaces: How To Rethink The Interactive Syllabus

On February 12th, I logged in to my wikispaces account only to learn the site would soon be shutting down. Wikispaces started in 2005. I think I started using it sometime around 2007/2008 to create course syllabi. I liked it because it allowed me to create a more dynamic, interactive syllabus: Related: Setting Up the …

Powerful Reasons for Creating a Self-Paced Curriculum

At the start of the semester, I released the first two weeks of content to my students. This class, like last semester, is 100% online. There are 12 weeks total, and each week is clearly delineated in terms of dates and what to do during each week. I chose to release the first two weeks …

The Best 11 Posts of 2017

Every December I like to revisit what I have been yammering on about for the last 11 months or so. While I do have a Best Of list, I also think it’s nice to identify one post from each month that I think is worth reading (or rereading). Here are the posts from 2017 that I …

Networks vs. Groups in Online Instruction

I’ve been reading Teaching Crowds: Learning & Social Media (Dron & Anderson, 2014). I bought it to help me think about a research project, but it’s also really helping me make sense of my teaching. In the book, the authors discuss the differences between learning in groups, networks, sets, and with collectives. In this post, I …

Earning an A in an Online Class

About halfway through the semester I realized something: two of my students had achieved enough points to earn an A. How is that possible, and what should I do about it? For the record, the majority of the students have earned enough points for a C at the midpoint. If you’re doing about an average …

Class is Fun: Is That a Compliment?

Early on in the semester, I had a student message me and tell me that she was finding my class to be fun. Since then, several others have said the same thing. And you know what? I’m glad. I want class to be fun, and I’m not ashamed to say it. Having our classes be …

The Syllabus as Verb

Recently, I wrote a post where I talked about how I structured my syllabus around the terms Read, Watch, Do, & Play.  I used these terms because I thought they better captured the spirit of the work I was asking students to do in my upcoming online course. I received some feedback on twitter: Now, I don’t have …

The Messiness of Online Teaching

As you know, I am gearing up to teach my first fully online course this fall (and a second in the spring). Until now, I have taught only hybrid classes. I’m very excited and, if you’ve been following, I’ve been exploring lots of ideas for what I might do (see here, here, and here).  It …

The Scary Part About Being a Student

It’s summer! I just moved from North Carolina to Wyoming to start a new job. I’m getting settled in. Posts between now and August 21st will be intermittent as I get up to speed. Regular content will resume August 21st. Recently, I drove about 1800 miles to move from Durham, NC to Laramie, WY. You …

Framing the Problem

When I think about writing a syllabus, and how I want to structure a class, I tend to formulate it around questions. For example, I have taught a class where the overarching question was, “What does it mean to be literate?” and another where it was, “What counts as knowledge?” I then use these larger …

May Video Round Up

At the end of each month, I do a brief overview of the videos posted to my You Tube Channel. Here’s the run down for May: Creating Book Snaps This month, I learned about book snaps and gave them a go. There are lots of possibilities for how you can incorporate them into your instruction. …